As a parent, you only want the very best for your son or daughter. When your child was young, you would step in whenever he/she needed help. Now that he/she progresses into adulthood and is becoming more independent, you are learning to let go, but yet a part of you still wants to help them make good career choices.

tdct-planning-daughter-graduation

The transition from high school to university is a big leap, your child is often expected to plan and manage his/her own academics or extra-circular activities with little guidance. Depending on the size of the companies, most firms would only offer one to two spots for summer internships, which means competition is fierce. Academic achievement is just one of many qualities employers look for; leadership and communication skills as well as business acumen are the main drivers for success.

How would career consulting benefit your child?

Most of the official summer internships are offered at year three (some banks now offer internships to year one students), of which 80% of placements are achieved through networking. To land these offers, students would have to showcase their previous track records. They would have to strategize their career management early to build their personal brandings, and gain industry knowledge through networking. Almost every fresh graduate I spoke with wished that he/she had started thinking about his/her career at a younger age. The earlier your child establishes a career goal, the sooner he/she can target meaningful activities to build the relevant skills, and boost his/her career profile accordingly.

While most universities offer career support, the resources available are usually at surface level (a ratio of 1 staff to 1000 undergraduate students if you are lucky) and your child will rarely get one-on-one support in their freshman years. As you may be aware, the job market nowadays is very different than ten years ago. A growing number of roles are being outsourced and new job functions are being created each day. As a seasoned recruiter, I am kept abreast of the latest industry updates through my personal contacts, so your child can be ahead of the game when making well-informed career decisions.

Further questions?

Get in touch for an initial consultation. I am more than happy to discuss with you in person or over a call to further discuss the nature of job markets in North America and China/Hong Kong.

As a parent, you only want the very best for your son or daughter. When your child was young, you would step in whenever he/she needed help. Now that he/she progresses into adulthood and is becoming more independent, you are learning to let go, but yet a part of you still wants to help them make good career choices.

tdct-planning-daughter-graduation

The transition from high school to university is a big leap, your child is often expected to plan and manage his/her own academics or extra-circular activities with little guidance. Depending on the size of the companies, most firms would only offer one to two spots for summer internships, which means competition is fierce. Academic achievement is just one of many qualities employers look for; leadership and communication skills as well as business acumen are the main drivers for success.

How would career consulting benefit your child?

Most of the official summer internships are offered at year three (some banks now offer internships to year one students), of which 80% of placements are achieved through networking. To land these offers, students would have to showcase their previous track records. They would have to strategize their career management early to build their personal brandings, and gain industry knowledge through networking. Almost every fresh graduate I spoke with wished that he/she had started thinking about his/her career at a younger age. The earlier your child establishes a career goal, the sooner he/she can target meaningful activities to build the relevant skills, and boost his/her career profile accordingly.

While most universities offer career support, the resources available are usually at surface level (a ratio of 1 staff to 1000 undergraduate students if you are lucky) and your child will rarely get one-on-one support in their freshman years. As you may be aware, the job market nowadays is very different than ten years ago. A growing number of roles are being outsourced and new job functions are being created each day. As a seasoned recruiter, I am kept abreast of the latest industry updates through my personal contacts, so your child can be ahead of the game when making well-informed career decisions.

Further questions?

Get in touch for an initial consultation. I am more than happy to discuss with you in person or over a call to further discuss the nature of job markets in North America and China/Hong Kong.

As a parent, you only want the very best for your son or daughter. When your child was young, you would step in whenever he/she needed help. Now that he/she progresses into adulthood and is becoming more independent, you are learning to let go, but yet a part of you still wants to help them make good career choices.

tdct-planning-daughter-graduation

The transition from high school to university is a big leap, your child is often expected to plan and manage his/her own academics or extra-circular activities with little guidance. Depending on the size of the companies, most firms would only offer one to two spots for summer internships, which means competition is fierce. Academic achievement is just one of many qualities employers look for; leadership and communication skills as well as business acumen are the main drivers for success.

How would career consulting benefit your child?

Most of the official summer internships are offered at year three (some banks now offer internships to year one students), of which 80% of placements are achieved through networking. To land these offers, students would have to showcase their previous track records. They would have to strategize their career management early to build their personal brandings, and gain industry knowledge through networking. Almost every fresh graduate I spoke with wished that he/she had started thinking about his/her career at a younger age. The earlier your child establishes a career goal, the sooner he/she can target meaningful activities to build the relevant skills, and boost his/her career profile accordingly.

While most universities offer career support, the resources available are usually at surface level (a ratio of 1 staff to 1000 undergraduate students if you are lucky) and your child will rarely get one-on-one support in their freshman years. As you may be aware, the job market nowadays is very different than ten years ago. A growing number of roles are being outsourced and new job functions are being created each day. As a seasoned recruiter, I am kept abreast of the latest industry updates through my personal contacts, so your child can be ahead of the game when making well-informed career decisions.

Further questions?

Get in touch for an initial consultation. I am more than happy to discuss with you in person or over a call to further discuss the nature of job markets in North America and China/Hong Kong.

As a parent, you only want the very best for your son or daughter. When your child was young, you would step in whenever he/she needed help. Now that he/she progresses into adulthood and is becoming more independent, you are learning to let go, but yet a part of you still wants to help them make good career choices.

tdct-planning-daughter-graduation

The transition from high school to university is a big leap, your child is often expected to plan and manage his/her own academics or extra-circular activities with little guidance. Depending on the size of the companies, most firms would only offer one to two spots for summer internships, which means competition is fierce. Academic achievement is just one of many qualities employers look for; leadership and communication skills as well as business acumen are the main drivers for success.

How would career consulting benefit your child?

Most of the official summer internships are offered at year three (some banks now offer internships to year one students), of which 80% of placements are achieved through networking. To land these offers, students would have to showcase their previous track records. They would have to strategize their career management early to build their personal brandings, and gain industry knowledge through networking. Almost every fresh graduate I spoke with wished that he/she had started thinking about his/her career at a younger age. The earlier your child establishes a career goal, the sooner he/she can target meaningful activities to build the relevant skills, and boost his/her career profile accordingly.

While most universities offer career support, the resources available are usually at surface level (a ratio of 1 staff to 1000 undergraduate students if you are lucky) and your child will rarely get one-on-one support in their freshman years. As you may be aware, the job market nowadays is very different than ten years ago. A growing number of roles are being outsourced and new job functions are being created each day. As a seasoned recruiter, I am kept abreast of the latest industry updates through my personal contacts, so your child can be ahead of the game when making well-informed career decisions.

Further questions?

Get in touch for an initial consultation. I am more than happy to discuss with you in person or over a call to further discuss the nature of job markets in North America and China/Hong Kong.

As a parent, you only want the very best for your son or daughter. When your child was young, you would step in whenever he/she needed help. Now that he/she progresses into adulthood and is becoming more independent, you are learning to let go, but yet a part of you still wants to help them make good career choices.

tdct-planning-daughter-graduation

The transition from high school to university is a big leap, your child is often expected to plan and manage his/her own academics or extra-circular activities with little guidance. Depending on the size of the companies, most firms would only offer one to two spots for summer internships, which means competition is fierce. Academic achievement is just one of many qualities employers look for; leadership and communication skills as well as business acumen are the main drivers for success.

How would career consulting benefit your child?

Most of the official summer internships are offered at year three (some banks now offer internships to year one students), of which 80% of placements are achieved through networking. To land these offers, students would have to showcase their previous track records. They would have to strategize their career management early to build their personal brandings, and gain industry knowledge through networking. Almost every fresh graduate I spoke with wished that he/she had started thinking about his/her career at a younger age. The earlier your child establishes a career goal, the sooner he/she can target meaningful activities to build the relevant skills, and boost his/her career profile accordingly.

While most universities offer career support, the resources available are usually at surface level (a ratio of 1 staff to 1000 undergraduate students if you are lucky) and your child will rarely get one-on-one support in their freshman years. As you may be aware, the job market nowadays is very different than ten years ago. A growing number of roles are being outsourced and new job functions are being created each day. As a seasoned recruiter, I am kept abreast of the latest industry updates through my personal contacts, so your child can be ahead of the game when making well-informed career decisions.

Further questions?

Get in touch for an initial consultation. I am more than happy to discuss with you in person or over a call to further discuss the nature of job markets in North America and China/Hong Kong.

As a parent, you only want the very best for your son or daughter. When your child was young, you would step in whenever he/she needed help. Now that he/she progresses into adulthood and is becoming more independent, you are learning to let go, but yet a part of you still wants to help them make good career choices.

tdct-planning-daughter-graduation

The transition from high school to university is a big leap, your child is often expected to plan and manage his/her own academics or extra-circular activities with little guidance. Depending on the size of the companies, most firms would only offer one to two spots for summer internships, which means competition is fierce. Academic achievement is just one of many qualities employers look for; leadership and communication skills as well as business acumen are the main drivers for success.

How would career consulting benefit your child?

Most of the official summer internships are offered at year three (some banks now offer internships to year one students), of which 80% of placements are achieved through networking. To land these offers, students would have to showcase their previous track records. They would have to strategize their career management early to build their personal brandings, and gain industry knowledge through networking. Almost every fresh graduate I spoke with wished that he/she had started thinking about his/her career at a younger age. The earlier your child establishes a career goal, the sooner he/she can target meaningful activities to build the relevant skills, and boost his/her career profile accordingly.

While most universities offer career support, the resources available are usually at surface level (a ratio of 1 staff to 1000 undergraduate students if you are lucky) and your child will rarely get one-on-one support in their freshman years. As you may be aware, the job market nowadays is very different than ten years ago. A growing number of roles are being outsourced and new job functions are being created each day. As a seasoned recruiter, I am kept abreast of the latest industry updates through my personal contacts, so your child can be ahead of the game when making well-informed career decisions.

Further questions?

Get in touch for an initial consultation. I am more than happy to discuss with you in person or over a call to further discuss the nature of job markets in North America and China/Hong Kong.

As a parent, you only want the very best for your son or daughter. When your child was young, you would step in whenever he/she needed help. Now that he/she progresses into adulthood and is becoming more independent, you are learning to let go, but yet a part of you still wants to help them make good career choices.

tdct-planning-daughter-graduation

The transition from high school to university is a big leap, your child is often expected to plan and manage his/her own academics or extra-circular activities with little guidance. Depending on the size of the companies, most firms would only offer one to two spots for summer internships, which means competition is fierce. Academic achievement is just one of many qualities employers look for; leadership and communication skills as well as business acumen are the main drivers for success.

How would career consulting benefit your child?

Most of the official summer internships are offered at year three (some banks now offer internships to year one students), of which 80% of placements are achieved through networking. To land these offers, students would have to showcase their previous track records. They would have to strategize their career management early to build their personal brandings, and gain industry knowledge through networking. Almost every fresh graduate I spoke with wished that he/she had started thinking about his/her career at a younger age. The earlier your child establishes a career goal, the sooner he/she can target meaningful activities to build the relevant skills, and boost his/her career profile accordingly.

While most universities offer career support, the resources available are usually at surface level (a ratio of 1 staff to 1000 undergraduate students if you are lucky) and your child will rarely get one-on-one support in their freshman years. As you may be aware, the job market nowadays is very different than ten years ago. A growing number of roles are being outsourced and new job functions are being created each day. As a seasoned recruiter, I am kept abreast of the latest industry updates through my personal contacts, so your child can be ahead of the game when making well-informed career decisions.

Further questions?

Get in touch for an initial consultation. I am more than happy to discuss with you in person or over a call to further discuss the nature of job markets in North America and China/Hong Kong.

As a parent, you only want the very best for your son or daughter. When your child was young, you would step in whenever he/she needed help. Now that he/she progresses into adulthood and is becoming more independent, you are learning to let go, but yet a part of you still wants to help them make good career choices.

tdct-planning-daughter-graduation

The transition from high school to university is a big leap, your child is often expected to plan and manage his/her own academics or extra-circular activities with little guidance. Depending on the size of the companies, most firms would only offer one to two spots for summer internships, which means competition is fierce. Academic achievement is just one of many qualities employers look for; leadership and communication skills as well as business acumen are the main drivers for success.

How would career consulting benefit your child?

Most of the official summer internships are offered at year three (some banks now offer internships to year one students), of which 80% of placements are achieved through networking. To land these offers, students would have to showcase their previous track records. They would have to strategize their career management early to build their personal brandings, and gain industry knowledge through networking. Almost every fresh graduate I spoke with wished that he/she had started thinking about his/her career at a younger age. The earlier your child establishes a career goal, the sooner he/she can target meaningful activities to build the relevant skills, and boost his/her career profile accordingly.

While most universities offer career support, the resources available are usually at surface level (a ratio of 1 staff to 1000 undergraduate students if you are lucky) and your child will rarely get one-on-one support in their freshman years. As you may be aware, the job market nowadays is very different than ten years ago. A growing number of roles are being outsourced and new job functions are being created each day. As a seasoned recruiter, I am kept abreast of the latest industry updates through my personal contacts, so your child can be ahead of the game when making well-informed career decisions.

Further questions?

Get in touch for an initial consultation. I am more than happy to discuss with you in person or over a call to further discuss the nature of job markets in North America and China/Hong Kong.